Call Us!
(509) 204-1883

Stinging Insects

Usually stinging pests will not sting unless trapped or pressed against skin. If a person is allergic to the insect’s sting this can pose a life-threatening reaction that needs immediate medical attention.

Bees, wasps and scorpions, are more beneficial to the environment than they are harmful and should be left alone if possible. If removal is necessary it is best to consult a professional.

Entry: Stinging pests that fly can gain entry to your home through open windows or doors, or by squeezing through small openings. These pests are usually in search of a new nest location, rather than food. Scorpions find their way inside through open windows and doors, and also will squeeze in through small openings. They will climb curtains and walls and hide in shoes, bedding, and furniture.

Scent Trails: Some stinging pests use pheromones to communicate with each other. If a bee feels threatened it will send out a pheromone scent to alert other bees in its colony to come to its aid.

Nest Locations: Bees will make a hive in trees, on the ground, as well as in a building. Scorpions nest in the ground and are often found under rocks or near concrete walls.

Do-it-yourself Effectiveness: Keep foods covered when outside and discard garbage in sealed bags away from your home. Avoid wearing bright colors or perfumes when outside.

honeybee

Africanized (Killer) Honeybee

The Africanized Honeybee looks just like the Honeybee with the characteristic black stripes across a yellow body. Honeybees send out a scent that alerts the colony to danger and some will come out, attack the intruder, and return to the nest.

European Hornet

European Hornet

The European Hornet is brown with yellow on its lower body and abdomen. In spring the queen emerges from hibernation and prepares her nest with paper she makes from her saliva and wood from nearby trees.

parasite tick

American Dog Tick

The American Dog Tick is prolific in wooded areas where pre-adults feed on small rodents and the adults use the forest animals as hosts. Adults climb up shrubbery and wait for a host to walk by.

Black-Legged Tick (a.k.a. Deer Tick)

Black-Legged Tick (a.k.a. Deer Tick)

The female Black-legged Tick has a red and brown body while the male is smaller and has a darker body. The Black-legged Tick lives for 2 to 3 years.

woman-face-4

Human Head Lice

Human Head Lice lay their eggs on the hair shaft, close to the scalp. The egg cases, called nits, are sticky and will not come off during regular hair washing but must be picked off or combed off with a very fine toothed comb.

Bumblebee

Bumblebee

The Bumblebee lives in a small colony and gathers pollen to make honey in its hive. Many bumblebees have contrasting yellow and black stripes, some have orange or red, while others are all black. They also have soft long hair covering their bodies.

Yellow Jacket

Yellow Jacket

Yellow Jackets are black and yellow, like the honeybee, but do not gather pollen. The queen emerges from her winter hibernation in spring, locates a nest site in an abandoned underground burrow or crevice in a building and begins laying eggs.

Bed Bugs

Bed Bugs

Bed Bugs are reddish-brown, oval shaped and flat. They hide in sheets, blankets, seams of mattresses, carpet, baseboards, behind wallpaper and in furniture. They venture out at night to feed. Bed bugs can live more than a year and lay up to eight eggs a day.

Brown Dog Tick

Brown Dog Tick

The Brown Dog Tick is slightly longer than other tick species and is most commonly found on our pet dogs but will also feed on humans and other animals.

Kissing Bug

Kissing Bug

They look like flattened insects with extended, cone-shaped heads bearing a pair of five to six-segmented, elbowed antennae and a prominent “beak.”

Bald-faced Hornet on a Leaf

Bald-Faced Hornet

The Bald-faced Hornets are black with white markings on their faces and bodies. The queen will emerge from her winter hibernation and prepare her nest in a tree by making paper with her saliva and wood from nearby trees.

Common Honeybee on White Background

Honeybee

The Honeybee is a social insect that creates a colony comprising one queen, about a thousand fertile male drones, and many thousands of non-fertile workers. The workers fertilize vegetation as they gather pollen from nearby flowers.

man-face-4

Bird Lice

Bird Lice are small and vary in color and hard to see. Eggs are attached to the feather, close to the skin and hatch in a few days.

man-face-4

Cat Flea

The Cat Flea is the most common flea found on pets, preferring domestic dogs and cats as its host. The Cat Flea can carry eggs of the tape worm parasite and transfer the tapeworm to the dog or cat.

Lone Star Tick

Lone Star Tick

The Lone Star Tick is brown thrives in wooded areas, especially near water, where it can be aggressive in finding hosts such as deer and other mammals. The female has a white star on her back.

Carpenter Bee

Carpenter Bee

The Carpenter Bee is a large bee, usually black with some yellow and in some species the males are tan. Like the Honeybee, Carpenter Bees aid vegetation growth by pollinating plants as they gather pollen from flowers.

Scorpion

Scorpion

Scorpions are easily recognized with a venomous stinger at the end of a tail that curves over their back. They have eight legs and range from two to six inches in length. They glow in the dark when exposed to ultraviolet light.

man-face-3

Bird Mite

Bird mites are tiny eight legged parasites that live primarily on birds and breed in their nests. They multiply quickly. Eggs hatch in 3 days and reach adult stage in 5 days.

Fire ant

Fire Ant

The Fire Ant is a reddish brown ant that is known to be very aggressive and will sting with little provocation. It nests in the ground, creating a mound that is about 6” high and 1 to 2 feet across but can be larger.